Wednesday, 25 March 2015

An Introduction to...Aaaron Benwell

1. Quick intro…Who are you?

Aaron Benwell; university grad in Anthropology, retail prisoner and writer.

2. What first inspired you to start writing?

I honestly can't remember. I was in primary school and wrote lots about Greek myths and then in secondary school I always did well in writing, especially in the 'Gothic' genre. I just like it. I like building my own little world where people can live lives that I've created and carry them on even when the pages have stopped.

  1. Do you find it difficult being an indie author when so many others are also now doing it? 

YES. It is so hard to stand out from the crowd. However, it's also nice, there's so many other people willing to share your work and read it and help you with questions you have. So although you're constantly trying to get above the wave of people it's also great to be able to have such a large support group.

  1. What keeps you writing? 

I don't want to be in a dead and job the rest of my life and although a difficult way to go about getting out of said jobs it's the easiest for me. It's what I love doing and keeps me entertained when I can't be bothered to do anything else. Also now I've started I want to get everything perfect, so I want to keep doing the new editions and finishing my novels is a big TO DO.

  1. Why do you write? 

I write because I love it. I like hearing or seeing people's reactions as they read a gruesome part of a story of mine and also, honestly, like everyone trying to earn a living I write them so I can sell them.

  1. I read one of your short stories ‘The Taste of Her Skin’, where did the inspiration come from?

I accidentally stumbled across an interview with a cannibal on Youtube (like you do) and although disgusted, I felt kind of sorry for him, because he obviously wasn't 'all there' and although being a nasty man he almost didn't understand what he had done was wrong.
Then I was just sat there writing part of my novel and wrote the random gory scene, but it in no way fitted into Terra and so decided to write is as a short.

  1. When you create the characters for your short stories, do you have anyone in mind that they’re based on? Relatives, friends, enemies?
Not really for the shorts. I just try to think how I'd react in that situation... which is usually ridiculously panicky. For my novel though (which is being edited) I have based the two main characters on my own and my partners personalities. It just seemed easier to understand them when I was writing as I obviously knew them so well.

  1. What are your favourite 3 songs ever?

Hmm probably A New Error by Moderat (I listen to it whenever I need some inspiration), Mouthwash, by Kate Nash, thats a good one if I'm feeling a bit shit about my Tourettes. And Placebo's Post Blue, that one is mine and Aidans song.

  1. Do you have to plan to write or are you constantly jotting ideas and lines down?

I have days where I force myself to write, I'll need something finished but it'll feel a bit of a drag. That's usually when it's tying up loose ends. But usually I just write when I have an idea.

  1. What do you think it takes to stand out from the indie author crowd?

It takes a good lot of genuine mentions. For instance on Twitter (it's a gold mine for indie writers with all the readers, mass updates and the amount of people who like to help each other), a retweet is great! But a retweet with a genuine review makes people notice that the works actually been enjoyed. Also, having a great promoter like my sister Kelly and my parents is amazing... They're constantly telling random people that I'm on Amazon. However don't google me just yet as a man who happened to murder people comes up before me; with the same name... fantastic. So a great promoter, a genuine review and also a great artists and editor (Aidan Chewings, Hattie Hilsdon and Terri King are my talented peeps). If your work is fantastic but it looks a bit bland or reads juxtaposed then people put it under the rather rude title of "just another typical self pub". I don't think people realise how hard self publishers have to work.

  1. What is the ultimate goal you hope to achieve with your writing?

 I would like to be able to live off of the earnings, rather than just as a top up. I think that means I have to be traditionally published, which I am going down the path of now, because people tend to take that more seriously (which is a shame and hopefully that changes soon). I'll keep my shorts and FaeryFables as self published though; so I still feel completely in control of some of my work and can feel more involved in the reviews and feedback.

  1. What would ‘living the dream’ be to you?

 ... I don't know why but it would be having enough money to basically live off of nothing, so owning a small holding and growing everything and living in a big old house with shutters... It sounds a bit boring but there we go. I really want a house pig (Aidan however, quite understandably doesn't... but less understandably would prefer snakes!?.)

  1. Who would you most like to read your work (a hero/idol)?

 I would like any of my favourite authors to read them and like them; Terry Pratchett, Charlaine Harris (shh), J.K.Rowling, Neil Gaiman, Dianna Wynne Jones, Jon Ronson, Suzanne Collins... the list goes on. Also, there was a man who laughed at me in my university interview in Gloucester to study Illustration, who said "pft you can't just write a book don't be stupid, it takes years... it takes talent!" So I'd like him to read my books as well.

  1.  What is your favourite book?

 The Hobbit. Without question. It kept me going through detentions at primary school and I can reread it at anytime and fall in love with it all over again.

  1. What’s the least favourite book you’ve read?

 I feel kind of bad saying it, but J. K. Rowling's A Casual Vacancy. I wanted to enjoy it so much, it was a book for the generation who had grown beyond Harry Potter. We all ended Harry Potter together and it was a new genre and something more 'grown up' for us... but my god was it boring. I couldn't finish it. I started off enjoying it but it just seemed to keep going with nothing happening. If it was shorter I think I'd enjoy it more.
Also, Castle in The Air, by Dianna Wynne Jones. I was genuinely obsessed with the book Howl's Moving Castle and wanted to be just as obsessed with this but just wasn't. So really they're not bad books and in no way poor authors, I just was disappointed by how un-obsessed I was with them.

  1. Do you only write one specific genre or are you multi-talented?

My style is quite dark. My shorts are horror, my Faeryfables are more gruesome and honest and my novel defiantly has a dark side to it. I tried to write comedy but frankly trying to write a funny line is harder than saying one and apparently being disgusting and creepy comes naturally.

  1. How did you come up with the title for your first book?

I have in the past suffered with waking dreams. You are stuck, paralysed, semi- awake thinking someone or something is in your room talking or touching you. It is terrifying and it seemed only appropriate that my firs sets of horrors should be named after something that I find personally bloody petrifying.

  1. If you had to live without ever reading OR writing again, which would you choose and why?

Hmm, Okay this took me a while, but I think I'd keep the reading. I love writing but I most of the time I know where the story's going, but I like to be surprised. Plus either way I get the same feeling of being in another world for half hour or so, so I'd be happy.

  1. How do you find the promotional aspect of being an indie author?

I always feel like I'm being annoying. I try not to shout BUY MY BOOK at people, but sometimes feel I am doing that. It is hard. Telling people you know to buy it too is also hard... you get the "really? YOU wrote something and I have to buy it?" look (don't get me wrong lots of people are genuinely proud). So I try and stick to promoting it to people I don't know, who hopefully I'm not annoying.

  1. What is your preferred genre to read?

Fantasy and/or humour. I love Terry Pratchett, he's hilarious. Oh and Philip Pullman, His Dark Materials was pure genius.

  1. Give us a random fact about yourself.

I can fit my whole finger through my ear lobe and I use it to keep one of my nephews entertained if I fail at being an interesting uncle.

  1. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up and what are you actually doing now?

I for some reason didn't want to be a fireman or a space man I wanted to be like a character in my favourite book called Mr Patel and he owned a shop... so I wanted to be a shop owner. Ironically most of my jobs have been in retail (university does that to you).

  1. List your websites, blog, Facebook, Twitter and the links to your books or author page on Amazon and any upcoming promotional days.

My website is and you can find all up and coming books and promotions there. My quick promo's though are easiest to find on my Twitter;
@getyourhorroron that ones the link to my Amazon page, where all my current downloadable books are; Anna, The Grey Figure, The Taste of Her Skin and the collection of them all; Waking Dreams.

Saturday, 29 June 2013

An Introduction To...Judith Barrow

Quick intro…Who are you?

My name is Judith Barrow Lived in a village at the base of the Pennines in the North of England. Now in Wales.

What first inspired you to start writing?

I’ve always written but only over the last ten years written for 

Do you find it difficult being an indie author when so many others are also now doing it?

I never really thought about it, so no. But I have a publisher as well for my other books.

What keeps you writing?

I can’t stop. I get tetchy if I ever miss a day – which is rare

Why do you write?

There are so many images and words in my head – I need to write them down.

What are your favourite 3 songs ever?

This will sound stupid but all my favourite songs are memories – and all because of my husband:

Judy in Disguise (with Glasses) by John Fred and his Playboy Band in early 1968 (from the first time he saw me in glasses)

The Lady in Red by Chris de Burgh. (my husband loves me in red – don’t ask – that’s as far as I go)

A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square sung by Nat King Cole (david bought the Cd for me to play in my car)

Do you have to plan to write or are you constantly jotting ideas and lines down?

Both – depends where I am I always have a notebook with me. But I write every day, usually in the early morning. If I’m on a roll I just keep going. Sometimes other plans just have to be put aside.

What do you think it takes to stand out from the indie author crowd?

Good writing, good plot, good characters, good dialogue. An ability to hold a reader in the suspension of disbelief

What is the ultimate goal you hope to achieve with your writing?

To write as many good books as I can. 

What would ‘living the dream’ be to you?

As a writer - I’d love for one of my books to be made into a television drama. It’s been suggested but there is so much competition I try not to dwell on it. If it happened I’d be ‘living my dream’

Otherwise, I love living in Pembrokeshire, the coastline is stunning, it ‘s been a good place to bring up a family and I have a husband I love and can rely on.

Who would you most like to read your work (a hero/idol)?

I don’t have an idol or a hero really; I think we’re all equal. I once sent my first book to Fern Britton! Hah!I got a signed photograph back but no mention of the book, Pattern of Shadows. I bet she didn’t even read it. But thinking about it, I’d like every woman in the world to read my eBook Silent Trauma. It tells the story of pregnant women who were prescribed a drug called Diethylstilboestrol between 1945 - 1972 (supposed to prevent miscarriages – it didn’t but it did cause dreadful internal damage to the children – especially the daughters) Silent Trauma is a novel, but at the start of each chapter there is a true fact about the drug. There are women today who don’t even know their problems have been caused by this drug. And, for every copy I sell, the charity ( gets ten per cent.

What is your favourite book?

I don’t have a specific favourite book. It’s eclectic, I suppose; George Eliot, John Grisham, Pat Barker, Maya Angelou, Anita Shreve. I actually like Dickens. And poetry -0 I love all forms of poetry. 

What’s the least favourite book you’ve read?

Hmm. I’ll usually give a novel sixty pages. If I haven’t got into to it by then I give up. I’ll probably get slated for this but I tried five times to read A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth. It did nothing for me. I know it’s had brilliant reviews but … perhaps it was just the wrong time for me to give it a go.

Do you only write one specific genre or are you multi-talented?

I liked writing the two sagas, pattern of Shadows and the sequel Changing Pattern which has just come out. And the eBook , Silent Traua is a contemporary story. But I have written plays for stage and radio and I love writing poetry when I have time. I teach creative writing as well. But multi-talented? I wouldn’t call it that; I’m just lucky I enjoy all genres.

How did you come up with the title for your first book?

I called my novel Pattern of Shadows because I believe my main character, Mary, lives within the shadows of her family’s expectations of her – a pattern that rules her life. Most of all she lives within the shadow of her own loyalties.I believe we all live within the confines of our own pattern of the shadows that rule our lives – our expectations and those of other people.

If you had to live without ever reading OR writing again, which would you choose and why?

I’d choose to write. I can’t imagine not writing.

How do you find the promotional aspect of being an indie author?

Truthfully? Online – which seems to be what most writers do – I’ve found hard. Oh, I’ve love meeting and promoting other authors through social media – I Tweet and use Facebook every day. And I’m trying to get into blogging more because I think I could find out more about the way people write and could learn from them. But I’ve used Create Space to have some copies printed and I love giving readings and talks about Silent Trauma. 

What is your preferred genre to read?

History, crime fiction, sagas, biographies

Give us a random fact about yourself.

I was once a qualified swimming teacher

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up and what are you actually doing now?

A writer. And a writer. In between, besides being a wife, a mother, I’ve mostly been a Civil Servant

Saturday, 15 June 2013

Poetry Feature with Loren Kleinman

An Introduction

Loren Kleinman is a young, American-born poet with roots in New Jersey. Her poetry explores the results of love and loss, and how both themes affect an individual’s internal and external voice. She has a B.A. in English Literature from Drew University and an M.A. in Creative and Critical Writing from the University of Sussex (UK). Her poetry has appeared in literary journals such as Nimrod, Journal of New Jersey Poets, Resurgence (UK), HerCircleEzine and Aesthetica Annual. She was the recipient of the Spire Press Poetry Prize (2003), was a 2000 and 2003 Pushcart Prize nominee, and was a 2003 Nimrod/Pablo Neruda Prize finalist for poetry.

In 2003, Spire Press (NYC) published her first collection of poetry Flamenco Sketches, which explored the relationship between love and jazz. Kleinman judged the literary entries for the book Alt-History: New Writing from Brighton published by QueenSpark Books (UK). She was also a contributing editor/writer for the Cancer Dancer by Patricia San Pedro. Kleinman is also a columnist for (IR) where she interviews NYT bestselling indie authors. Many of those interviews in IR reappeared in USA Today and the Huffington Post.

Her second collection of poetry, The Dark Cave Between My Ribs, is due to release in 2014 (Winter Goose Publishing, 2014). She is also working on a New Adult literary romance novel, This Way to Forever, and a collection of interviews and essays that explore the vibrant community of indie authors (Publisher: IndieReader).

Kleinman will be presenting a two-day seminar at Sentences 5: A Conference on Writing Prose at Drew University in July 2013. Kleinman also owns and operates a small, boutique editorial firm, LK Editorial, where she edits poetry, offers social media services, and instructional design consultations.

About the Book & The Inspiration
I just signed with Winter Goose Publishing, and The Dark Cave Between My Ribs will be out in 2014. I started writing the poetry collection back in 2004 and finally hunkered down to re-write most of the collection this past year. The book is about love and loss, but also about letting go and being open to love, again. The book was primarily inspired by a traumatic experience I went through in 2003, I started writing the book as a way to heal. The process of writing resembles the process of grief in way. In as sense I went through the emotions, explored the sadness through writing, and through revision found a new voice, found new possibilities to live again. While I wrote the book as a way to heal, the book is not just about healing, love and loss are part of the human condition; they are real and raw experiences. Death is part of life, love is part of life, and loss is natural as well as the process of grief. I wanted to write a book that celebrated life, celebrated loss, and love.

Samples of Loren Kleinmans' Poetry

Ode to Finding Happiness

I bare no resemblance to life,
to the trees and mint and the grapes.

The world is spaced out
on highways and sideways,

under the dirt in my fingernails,
and concrete foundations under houses,
and the parts in stories left out,

and the hellos spaced out between years
and years and years,

and in the repetition of life.

I wish I could find the happiness

that I read about in books

that exists in deep breathing and meditation.

I've looked under the blanket

where I've hidden my head

in shame,
away from the possibility of love and intimacy,
from the alcoholism in my family

away from the chance that I may be a drunk

alone and drunk and alone—
Happiness would be great.

It could open me up to more happiness,
but I'm not sure what would help,

and I don’t want to try yoga or smiling,

or force myself to look on the bright side of everything.

Where are you, smile?
Where are you, laughter?

Oh, I’ll wait around like a fool

for you to take my hand

and walk me away from the bright edge,

the sun melting away my anger,
growing the seeds for a new life.

I’m a Door

I’m a door,

hungry and dreaming,

the opening to a house

made of skin and bone,

I remember living

when I was a child,

playing in my mother’s house,

the toys scattered

on the floor

next to the chair and desk,

or near the window,

and mother calling me

under the exposed light.

I’m a passage

through which I,

the one I was before,


wanting warmth,

the small feeling

of pushing the door open

and looking past it,


Prayer for Love

Take me, Lord.

Hold me against the halo

around your heart.

Lord, let me laugh.

For once,

let me be myself

and see the end of the world

through my eyelids.

Let the storm,

the apocalypse



Hold me Lord.

Love me in your light.

When you let me go,

flood me with your blue ocean,

fish tickling my toes.

Oh Lord,

my mouth is open.

Pour the water in.

The Future

I’m working on a New Adult romance novel called This Way To Forever and a collection of interviews and essays with featuring indie authors and artists. Both books should be out by 2014. I’m also working on a third poetry collection. 

I’m always writing. I write mostly everyday. I get rejected. Lots of rejections from journals/magazines, but I keep writing. I read lots of poetry and fiction. There’s a new book on my nightstand every other week. My point is to keep going. I write through rejection, in between reading new books. My goal is to reach readers, to connect with them through writing, have them connect with themselves. The other goal is to keep writing. Keep writing against all odds, and stay true to myself, keep my voice.

Tell people why they should give poetry a chance.

It’s the art that all other genres stole from. It’s the basis of all art: fiction, non-fiction, music, etc. Poetry is part of our society, our world. It’s primal, the highest of all art forms. Poetry is not dead, though.

Where can we find you?

My social media contacts are:


Friday, 7 June 2013

An Introduction To...Drew Avera


1. Quick intro…Who are you?

My name is Drew Avera and I am an active duty navy guy and self published author.

2. What first inspired you to start writing? 

Reading comic books led to reading novels, from there I wanted to leave my mark on society. It took until I was 30 years old before I did something about it.

3. Do you find it difficult being an indie author when so many others are also now doing it?

Yes, but its a great community where most indies want to help spread the word. It's not cut throat like some other areas of life.

4. What keeps you writing? 

I want to see how the story ends.

5. Why do you write? 

Because it helps me express myself and share a part of myself that most people overlook.

6. What are your favourite 3 songs ever? 

Clones by Chevelle, Blackbird by Alter Bridge, and Holy Wars by Megadeth.

7. Do you have to plan to write or are you constantly jotting ideas and lines down? 

I work full time so I have to make time. It's important that I don't force myself to do it when I'm tired because my output sucks when that happens.

8. What do you think it takes to stand out from the indie author crowd? 

A gimmick, I haven't found mine yet lol.

9. What is the ultimate goal you hope to achieve with your writing?

 I would love to write full time and have a fan base eagerly awaiting my next release.

10. What would ‘living the dream’ be to you?

 Being able to live comfortably from book sales.

11. Who would you most like to read your work (a hero/idol)? 

Hugh Howey, I think he would dig it. Or Jim Butcher, I took some inspiration from both of those guys.

12. What is your favourite book? 

I don't have just one, but my favorite recent read was Collapse by Richard Stephenson.

13. What’s the least favourite book you’ve read?

The Hobbit, I only got through 36 pages. In my defense I was in 8th grade and have ADHD.

14. Do you only write one specific genre or are you multi-talented? 

I'm a science fiction, dystopian, speculative, historical fictionismologist

15. How did you come up with the title for your first book? 

Mars is known as the red planet, if the life support system was failing and everyone was going to die then the obvious title presented itself...Dead Planet.

16. If you had to live without ever reading OR writing again, which would you choose and why?

Writing, there's a lot of good books I've yet to read.

17. How do you find the promotional aspect of being an indie author? 

Painful, I'm still trying to figure it out.

18. What is your preferred genre to read? 

I like stuff like the Hunger Games.

19. Give us a random fact about yourself. 

I wrote the first draft of my book entirely on my iPhone.

20. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up and what are you actually doing now?

I wanted to be a rock star, I'm now in the navy...big difference.

21. List your websites, blog, Facebook, Twitter and the links to your books or author page on Amazon and any upcoming promotional days.

The Story of My Back Problems (& How I feel the NHS failed me)

8 or 9 years ago I was in the warehouse where I worked and the last half hour of that day for me was shit and scary as I didn’t know what had happened.
It was getting to the end of the day and my workmate at the time was messing about while I was working, he then ran from one end of the warehouse to the end where I was. He ran and jumped on my back in a ‘piggy back’ position when I was expecting it. It didn’t really work out as my I suddenly got the worst pain I’ve ever felt and my legs buckled from beneath me, I have to hold onto some shelving to keep myself from falling to the ground. I couldn’t use my legs for was seemed like forever but really It was more like 20-30 seconds. The inability to stand and the intense feeling of pain was what scared me.
I thought he’d broke my back!

I didn’t have the time to get angry as I was more focused on the agony I was feeling.
After I could hold myself up again I called my boss on the phone who worked about a mile or so down the road in the offices. He got there pretty quickly and I was taken to  A+E. Now I know to expect a long wait to be seen by a doctor at A+E from a previous time I had sprained my wrist and had to wait about 6 hours to be seen or the time when I couldn’t breathe very well (nearly stopped) due to a bad chest infection and my asthma flared up (which hadn’t been a problem in years) but that was also about a 3 hour wait, So yeah…I expected the wait.

When you’ve registered at the desk you go to the waiting room and wait to be called through for the initial talk…I think they’re trying to figure out who’s worse off so they prioritize patients. It was about a 1 hour 30min wait just for this. Speaking to the nurse, I told her what had happened and how my back felt so she gave me a couple of strong painkillers and sent me back to the waiting room.
After another few hours I was called back through to see a doctor, by this point the painkillers had really kicked in and relaxed me to the point of no pain and my head was floating. I was sent home after being told I had pulled my back and to rest it for a few days.

So I did what the doc said and surely enough within the week I felt normal again and life was great.

For a about a year or two I had no real problems, the occasional ache but nothing that worried me,   that was until one day at my new job I was sat counting steel nails to put in boxes of 100 (…seriously!) Lunch time was close so I thought I’d go put the kettle on ready for a coffee, as I went to stand up I felt a twinge in my back and I dropped back to the seat…as you can imagine…I was pissed off! The pain was back and inevitably I was off work for a couple of weeks.
I went to my local doctors practice explained everything and I was sent away with the information that I had pulled my back and just need to rest it along with 100 x 30/500 Cocodomol and 100 50mg Diclofenac.

Yet again the doctors advice and drugs worked and I was great again for a few months and then…I don’t know what I did but my back went again and I was straight back to the doctors again coming away with the same information and the same prescription.
This was routine for the next couple of years before one day the prescription became a repeat prescription so I didn’t always have to go speak to the doctor about what was up with me.

Here’s a funny one though…one of my visits to the doctors went like this…
(after explaining my history)
Dr: So how tall are you?
Me: 6ft – 6ft 1
Dr: ah well because you’re quite tall and you have quite a long body which makes your back longer, it will be weaker so more prone to a disc slipping. You never see a short man with a bad back.
I went away from that conversation thinking well this is great…early twenties and my back is knackered forever.

About 2-3 years ago I got a letter from my doctors practice saying they will be stopping giving me the anti-inflammatory Diclofenac as long term use has been known to cause heart problems.
From there I thought they would just replace the ant-inflammatory with another one but nope…they just increased my painkillers to 200 x 30/500 Cocodomol.
By this point I had already developed quite a dependence to the painkillers, when it hurt I took them and when It didn’t hurt I figured it’s a good idea to take them incase it started to hurt through the day. I was going through my 200 within a couple of weeks and at one point for a while I was taking my days worth (8) in an hour.

In 2011 I got married to my amazing and beautiful wife Sarah, after our honeymoon we woke up in the morning for our first day back at work, she had brought me a coffee and toast up to me as I sat up in the bed my back popped and I felt crippled in pain again. For the next 2 months I was using a walking stick to help prop me up, I was in and out of the doctors and A+E because my back kept failing me so throughout the early half the year the doctors were trying me on different painkillers to try and ease the nerve pain in my bum and leg.

This is a list of what I had taken by July 2011

Back to the doctors again…better result though…it took 7 years for them to use their heads but this could help me…they referred me for physio! I was excited at the prospect that I might be able to control my back problems with specific exercises.
Truth be told I was in the physio’s for maybe 15mins and 10 of that was me filling in a form and explaining what I had done.
I was given two exercises on a sheet of paper and sent away.

One day I had finally had enough, I got booked in to my doctors in an evening clinic to basically say I need surgery cos the drugs aren’t working and the physio was useless. As luck would have it…it was a different doctor to normal, this man was kind of standing in to cover him and because of this within a month I was sent for an MRI and referred to a spinal surgeon in Hull (York don’t do spinal surgery).
The MRI showed that my disc between L4 & L5 was very prolapsed and pinching nerves. It was a relief just to know what was going on with my spine.
Their first attempt at sorting it was with a nerve block injection into my back…the pain went…..for maybe the length of time of the car ride home.

Next it was a Discogram…..which is an extra diagnostic (that I wish never existed lol) to find out how damaged the disc is, they simulate your pain.
They do this with a BIG needle, they put the needle into the damaged disc and fill it with a liquid (actually a special dye that will show up on xray) little did I know how well they could get the pain identical…it kinda felt like someone had hit me in the lower back with an axe haha but as quickly as it came…it went.
Such a strange experience!

The results from this all came back saying the disc was prolapsed on both sides, The surgeon ended up asking if I would like surgery and I jumped at the chance.

Within a few months it was done! I had a bi-lateral lumbar discectomy (basically slice the sides of the discs that protrude off then sew it back up)
The recovery time was 6 weeks before I was back at work and it was easy, I remember saying I’d have the surgery again just to get the time off from work haha.

After I had technically recovered it was amazing…occasional stiffness but no major discomfort up until about 3 months ago….in the last 3 months I’ve pulled it 3 times.
  1. Standing up from a dining room chair.
  2. pulling my trousers up whilst getting dressed
  3. sneezing whilst brushing my teeth

All quite amusing ways I thing you’ll agree, especially the sneeze. So far the odd painkiller now and then (I did manage to break the dependence) seems to keep it at ease. I did try to make an appointment to see a doctor and explain I think I need to be referred to see my surgeon again but there’s a 3 week wait just to get into see my local doctor.

My point with all of this is…if I was sent to a good physio when it first happened there is a large possibility that my back wouldn’t have got worse and I wouldn’t have been taking so many painkillers but nope…it took 7 years to see a physio and also to get an MRI.
In my mind, how drastic this got for me could’ve been avoided if I wasn’t fobbed off with drugs every time I saw a doctor.

Although this is quite a long blogpost it’s just a fraction of what that 8-9 years have felt like.

My message to anyone going to a doctors and if you feel your being sent away with no real answer be more abrupt, say what you want if you feel the doctor is being negligent ask to see someone else. If your in pain or really worried about something don’t take no for an answer. They aren’t always right in their decisions the first 4 doctors I saw sent me away with drugs the 5th sent me away with drugs and MRI referral and hope.